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Waters, Rivers, and Ocean
 
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Below are the 20 most recent journal entries recorded in Don Cecil's LiveJournal:

[ << Previous 20 ]
Friday, May 5th, 2006
1:16 am
A Demonic...Teddy Bear?
Wow. This was actually a good read. Im scared of it...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=6056014456
Sunday, April 23rd, 2006
11:41 am
Thursday, March 23rd, 2006
9:06 am
Ross White
While doing my monthly back-tracking on my friends page of livejournal, I see that another great individual I went to school with has passed away. I remember Ross White as someone very humble and modest, and very intelligent. I did not really know him that well, or talk to him much, but get two people who are quiet and not much conversation will happen anyway! I always did feel good when I was around him though.

But it's another very tragic event that has happened. People seem to forget how sudden life can, and having been through so many deaths within this particular group of people/friends from school, I am really beginning to evaluate my own life, how much time I spend with my current friends, and how much love and helpfulness I am giving to the general public.

I feel we come in contact with people for a reason, and not spending time and learning from other people is a sad truth.
Monday, February 20th, 2006
8:26 am
Jon Stewart
Jon Stewart gets to host the Oscars this year, and this is what he is most excited about.

"My sincere hope is that there are some fun-size chocolate bars backstage, in say, a wicker basket," Stewart says. "Whether they be Musketeers or Milky Way, not really the issue."

Personally I am proud of the guy. He has always taken an irreverent approach to comedy and entertainment, and people have noticed him. So three cheers for Jon Stewart, one of the better comedians of our time.
Thursday, December 22nd, 2005
11:36 pm
Christian Marketing Reveals All
The marketing company that marketed Passion of the Christ, is now doing The Chronicles of Narnia. Take a peek in how they go about marketing these types of films in:
Wednesday, December 14th, 2005
7:44 pm
This shit is breathing down my neck
Lynne Miller is a great teacher, BUT DAMN.

Anyone in the know know's what the fuck I'm talking about.
Saturday, November 26th, 2005
6:35 am
I will actually dumpster dive for this...
Apparently Wendy's is having a promotional giveaway with AirTran Airways where if you collect coupons on 20oz and 32oz (med. and lrg.?) drink cups you earn 1/4 point to go towards a free flight - 32 cups can get you one way, and 64 cups can get you round-trip. The link containing the info is http://www.airtran.com/wendys_offer.aspx. The kicker is that I don't want to have to purchase 64 drinks to do this, so I am seriously considering dumpster diving! I would like some help from Austin or anyone else experienced in this. We can make a night of it and hit up all the Wendy's within range.
Tuesday, November 8th, 2005
5:17 pm
this is college
7 page essay due on thursday for anthropology on how ecological factors determine characteristics of culture.

driving to LA tomorrow to see the king tut exhibit at 6 in the evening. hoping to finish my essay sometime before that.

skipped a class today so i can work on my anthropology essay, but i took a nap instead! i plan on being up really late working on it now.

spent most of the day yesterday working on this essay.

essay.

essay.

essay.
Saturday, November 5th, 2005
9:41 pm
Monday, October 31st, 2005
7:54 am
It is Always Good to Ponder
"The religion of the future will be a cosmic religion. It should transcend a personal God and avoid dogmas and theology. Covering both the natural and the spiritual, it should be based on a religious sense arising from the experience of all things, natural and spiritual as a meaningful unity. If there is any religion that would cope with modern scientific needs, it would be Buddhism."

Albert Einstein
Saturday, October 29th, 2005
9:26 am
DUIs and SPEEDING
Long before he ran for office, George W. Bush was arrested in Kennebunkport, Maine, in 1976 for driving under the influence of alcohol. He pleaded guilty, paid a fine, and had his driver's license suspended for 30 days.

Over a century earlier, a sitting president was arrested for a vehicular crime. President Ulysses S. Grant was caught speeding in his horse and buggy. (haha!) He, too, pleaded guilty, paid a $20 fine, and had his buggy impounded.
Sunday, September 11th, 2005
9:13 am
Shoot me
I have turned into a "business type." I am currently at Starbucks w/ my laptop and paid $4 for 2 hours of internet.

Though I can't be blamed too harshly. I am working on a Cultural Anthro project dealing with statistics; "Men (blank) more or less than women" blank= drives white vehicles. So I have to watch cars drive by and keep tabs on white and non-white cars and the gender of the person behind the wheel.

Plus I have taken part in dealing with the Chinese mafia. That's what it feels like.. I sell Nike's on ebay, and when I get orders I gotta wire money to China and everything. I dont even know the name of the company. I think some things are better left unasked/unanswered.

Other than that - I might go watch The Locusts towards the end of the month -- if anyone else wants to join me? It will be...loud.

Current Mood: busy
Saturday, September 3rd, 2005
4:01 pm
Check this one out
My roomate just informed me she works with someone who was a guy, but had a sex-change..... and became a lesbian! Wow talk about a "run-around."
7:58 am
Bush's belated visit fails to appease his critics as estimated death toll tops 10,000
Taken from The Independent Online Edition
Because we must get our news from the UK if it's going to be truthful..
http://news.independent.co.uk/world/

President George Bush went to stricken New Orleans yesterday, part of a belated tour of the area laid waste by hurricane Katrina intended to show that he is on top of a natural disaster that is turning into an political disaster for his administration.
By Rupert Cornwell in Washington
Published: 03 September 2005

In a sharp change of tone, the President described federal aid efforts thus far as unacceptable but said that aid was "surging" into the region.

"This is one of the worst national disasters we have faced, with national consequences and there will be a national response," Mr Bush said as he arrived in New Orleans, having completed a tour of the devastated cities of Mobile, Alabama, and Biloxi on the Mississippi Gulf coast.

But the news continued to get worse, with explosions rocking the industrial area of the city and fires breaking out throughout the region. The estimated death toll in Louisiana alone is now exceeding 10,000.

Having noted during the tour that Congress had approved a $10.5bn (£5.8bn) aid package for the three-state region, in his televised statement Mr Bush appealed to viewers to send contributions in cash to the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army.

There is little chance that his visit, a full five days after the storm struck, will have the same tonic effect on Mr Bush's fortunes as his trip to the smouldering Ground Zero in New York after the 11 September attacks ­ regarded as the high point of his presidency, in which an entire country united behind him.

A country still struggling to grasp the dimensions of the catastrophe had been stunned by the outburst of Ray Nagin, the New Orleans mayor, voicing the fury, the frustration and sense of helplessness of those waiting to be evacuated. "Get off your asses and let's do something," he said in an emotional interview with a local radio station. "I need reinforcements, I need troops, man. This is a major, major deal." He later added: "Excuse my French, everybody in America, but I am pissed [fed up]."

Later the mayor, who accompanied Mr Bush on his tour, described how in the city's convention centre, which is being used as a refuge, 100 police officers were shot at on Thursday night. They chose to leave rather than return fire, for fear of hitting innocent people sheltering there in the darkness.

"I continue to hear that troops are on the way, but we are still continuing to protect the city with 1,500 National Guardsmen," Mr Nagin complained, challenging government claims that 30,000 guardsmen were on hand. He estimated that 50,000 people were still trapped in the city, thousands of whom would die unless relief arrived immediately.

Last night the National Guard arrived in force with food, water and weapons, churning through the floodwaters in a vast truck convoy with orders to retake the streets and bring relief to the suffering. At the New Orleans Convention Centre, some of the thousands of people awaiting their deliverance applauded, threw their hands skywards and screamed, "Thank you, Jesus!" as the camouflage-green trucks and hundreds of soldiers arrived.

America's old racial demons have been reawakened by the crisis unfolding in a city that is 67 per cent black, and where almost a third of the population already lived below the poverty level. As the emergency aid was being approved on Capitol Hill, a seething congressional black caucus demanded a far stronger response from the federal government. "Let not it be said that the difference between those who lived and those who died was poverty, age and skin colour," said Elijah Cummings, a Maryland representative.

The President insisted he was doing all he could, Mr Cummings said, " but I simply disagree. We heard the campaign slogan of 'compassionate conservatism'. We now want some compassion."

Other black congressmen drew scathing comparisons with the Iraq war, on which the US now spends more than $5bn a month. "They talked of 'shock and awe' in Iraq," said Jesse Jackson Jnr, an Illinois representative and son of the civil rights leader. In New Orleans, "we have witnessed the shockingly awful".

Even before Katrina, Mr Bush's ratings were at a record low. Now, from elements on the right, as well as the left, the White House has faced a barrage of criticism that the government has done far too little, too late.

Even the staunchly conservative Washington Times weighed in against Mr Bush. "We're pleased he finally caught a ride home from his vacation," the paper declared. But it was "time to crack heads," it wrote. Otherwise "he risks losing the one trait his critics have never dented, his ability to lead."

Mr Bush is blamed for downgrading the Federal Emergency Management Agency, for neglecting years of warnings about a potential hurricane calamity in New Orleans, and of failing to understand the magnitude of the crisis. The mantra of this president as he defends the "war on terror" is that the priority of his job is to keep the country safe. Yet the anarchy and violence in New Orleans show he is failing in that task.

The day the Mayor's patience ran out

'I told him [George Bush] we had an incredible crisis here and that his flying over in Air Force One does not do it justice.

I have no idea what they [George Bush and the Louisiana Governor, Kathleen Blanco] are doing. But I will tell you this: you know, God is looking down on all this and if they are not doing everything in their power to save people, they are going to pay the price.

I don't know whose

problem it is. I don't know whether it's the Governor's problem. I don't know whether it's the President's problem. But somebody needs to get their ass on a plane and sit down, the two of them, and figure this out right now.' - Ray Nagin, Mayor of New Orleans

In a sharp change of tone, the President described federal aid efforts thus far as unacceptable but said that aid was "surging" into the region.

"This is one of the worst national disasters we have faced, with national consequences and there will be a national response," Mr Bush said as he arrived in New Orleans, having completed a tour of the devastated cities of Mobile, Alabama, and Biloxi on the Mississippi Gulf coast.

But the news continued to get worse, with explosions rocking the industrial area of the city and fires breaking out throughout the region. The estimated death toll in Louisiana alone is now exceeding 10,000.

Having noted during the tour that Congress had approved a $10.5bn (£5.8bn) aid package for the three-state region, in his televised statement Mr Bush appealed to viewers to send contributions in cash to the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army.

There is little chance that his visit, a full five days after the storm struck, will have the same tonic effect on Mr Bush's fortunes as his trip to the smouldering Ground Zero in New York after the 11 September attacks ­ regarded as the high point of his presidency, in which an entire country united behind him.

A country still struggling to grasp the dimensions of the catastrophe had been stunned by the outburst of Ray Nagin, the New Orleans mayor, voicing the fury, the frustration and sense of helplessness of those waiting to be evacuated. "Get off your asses and let's do something," he said in an emotional interview with a local radio station. "I need reinforcements, I need troops, man. This is a major, major deal." He later added: "Excuse my French, everybody in America, but I am pissed [fed up]."

Later the mayor, who accompanied Mr Bush on his tour, described how in the city's convention centre, which is being used as a refuge, 100 police officers were shot at on Thursday night. They chose to leave rather than return fire, for fear of hitting innocent people sheltering there in the darkness.

"I continue to hear that troops are on the way, but we are still continuing to protect the city with 1,500 National Guardsmen," Mr Nagin complained, challenging government claims that 30,000 guardsmen were on hand. He estimated that 50,000 people were still trapped in the city, thousands of whom would die unless relief arrived immediately.

Last night the National Guard arrived in force with food, water and weapons, churning through the floodwaters in a vast truck convoy with orders to retake the streets and bring relief to the suffering. At the New Orleans Convention Centre, some of the thousands of people awaiting their deliverance applauded, threw their hands skywards and screamed, "Thank you, Jesus!" as the camouflage-green trucks and hundreds of soldiers arrived.

America's old racial demons have been reawakened by the crisis unfolding in a city that is 67 per cent black, and where almost a third of the population already lived below the poverty level. As the emergency aid was being approved on Capitol Hill, a seething congressional black caucus demanded a far stronger response from the federal government. "Let not it be said that the difference between those who lived and those who died was poverty, age and skin colour," said Elijah Cummings, a Maryland representative.

The President insisted he was doing all he could, Mr Cummings said, " but I simply disagree. We heard the campaign slogan of 'compassionate conservatism'. We now want some compassion."

Other black congressmen drew scathing comparisons with the Iraq war, on which the US now spends more than $5bn a month. "They talked of 'shock and awe' in Iraq," said Jesse Jackson Jnr, an Illinois representative and son of the civil rights leader. In New Orleans, "we have witnessed the shockingly awful".

Even before Katrina, Mr Bush's ratings were at a record low. Now, from elements on the right, as well as the left, the White House has faced a barrage of criticism that the government has done far too little, too late.

Even the staunchly conservative Washington Times weighed in against Mr Bush. "We're pleased he finally caught a ride home from his vacation," the paper declared. But it was "time to crack heads," it wrote. Otherwise "he risks losing the one trait his critics have never dented, his ability to lead."

Mr Bush is blamed for downgrading the Federal Emergency Management Agency, for neglecting years of warnings about a potential hurricane calamity in New Orleans, and of failing to understand the magnitude of the crisis. The mantra of this president as he defends the "war on terror" is that the priority of his job is to keep the country safe. Yet the anarchy and violence in New Orleans show he is failing in that task.

The day the Mayor's patience ran out

'I told him [George Bush] we had an incredible crisis here and that his flying over in Air Force One does not do it justice.

I have no idea what they [George Bush and the Louisiana Governor, Kathleen Blanco] are doing. But I will tell you this: you know, God is looking down on all this and if they are not doing everything in their power to save people, they are going to pay the price.

I don't know whose

problem it is. I don't know whether it's the Governor's problem. I don't know whether it's the President's problem. But somebody needs to get their ass on a plane and sit down, the two of them, and figure this out right now.' - Ray Nagin, Mayor of New Orleans

Current Mood: outraged
Friday, September 2nd, 2005
7:44 am
National tradgedy
It is hard to comprehend the situation in Louisianna. I send my condolences to the families who have lost a loved one.

What is amazing at the moment is the lack of response from the government. There has been efforts made, but not to the scale that is needed. Even in a state of emergency there is a ridiculous approval process to carry out efforts which takes too much time. These people are without water; there is not much room for an approval process.

My sentiments goes out to everyone in dire need because of Katrina.
Monday, August 29th, 2005
5:51 am
It takes only 30 seconds
Maybe this is something I shouldn't have even touched - I will be laughed at in heaven. But they make it way too easy!!

"As a minister with the ULC, its own denomination, you are granted the following rights:

• To perform marriages within your state, following the rules laid out by the state in which
you wish to perform said marriage.

• To perform funerals, baptisms, last rites or any other sort of legal ceremony or ritual you
wish to perform, except circumcision.

• To start a church of your own, be it a bricks and mortar building or on the internet.

• To absolve others of their sins as you have been absolved of yours."

Friday, August 26th, 2005
8:38 am
whew
maybe i shouldn't have signed up for a 12 hour day at school. i can distantly hear a collective "DUH!" :(
Monday, August 22nd, 2005
7:31 am
The time has come
And once again we need a roommate. Preferably by the 1st. Any takers?
Sunday, August 21st, 2005
7:20 am
Wake me up from this one
Of course: I haven't had a vivid dream in such a long time, and when had one last night it's of me killing someone.

And I can't put my finger on whether or not it was bad or good. My girlfriend and I were driving through the woods, and we stopped by this guys house trying to find directions to a campsite. He proceeded to blatantly make sexual remarks to my girlfriend, making it obvious he was wanting to have sex by means of rape. He started walking towards us so I had to fight back. I quickly grabbed a blunt object he had lying around. I initially just wanted to immobilize him so I took a swing at his legs, but when he was on the ground I repeatedly bashed his head in.

Then my dream turned into such a cheesy thriller movie where we would have to dodge the police and such. It was kind of funny in that sense, but I am still a little disturbed by it.

Anyone else ever had a dream where they killed someone?
Saturday, August 13th, 2005
12:40 pm
New day. Higher bills.
I have been making attempts to do better with my life. I just recently took summer school which I am happy that I did. But there is still a lot more that I need to do.

I need to get a stable job. I get worried/anxious some months because I have no idea if I will ever make enough money just to sustain myself. Gas prices are going up. My utilities have been going up little by little. I need to buy items for school - I need to buy food - I need to pay rent - I need to repair my car - I need to repay old school loans...when it all adds up it ends up being more than I can dish out sometimes. I have chosen not to pay for car insurance. Which is sad..now I am not even caring on whether I pay for things that I am legally obliged to.

Can I make changed to my lifestyle? Am I living too expensively? Are there things that I can live without, and others that I can't?

I beg to question whether or not it's all worth it. It seems the "American Dream", our personal freedom, has become our personal bondage.

I am not even through with school yet, and I am already sick of the amount of bills, responsibilities, obligations, etc. I and many, many others have to face with.
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